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expensive dried fruit price

 

Most and Least Expensive Ways To Buy
To determine whether fresh fruits and vegetables are more expensive than
processed, we compared prices for the 16 fruits and 20 vegetables for which
retail prices were available for both fresh and processed forms (canned,
frozen, dried, and/or juice). Not all processed forms are available for all
fruits and vegetables. Although green beans are available in fresh, canned,
and frozen forms, broccoli is only available in fresh and frozen form. On the
other hand, there may be more than one “type” for the forms available. For
example, fresh carrots are available as whole and as baby carrots, whereas
canned carrots are available whole or sliced. Some fruits and vegetables—
such as melons, lettuce, and celery—were excluded from this analysis
because they were only available in one form, typically fresh.
We also separated out the different types of juice (shelf-stable, refrigerated,
frozen, and frozen concentrate) for this analysis. For each fruit and
vegetable, we identified the forms with the highest and lowest price, both
per pound and per serving.
Most and Least Expensive
Forms of Fruits
No one form stood out as being the most expensive way of buying fruit at
retail. Four fruits were most expensive when purchased fresh, five when
purchased frozen, four when purchased canned, and three as dried, while
juice was never the most expensive (fig. 11a). By serving, canned fruit
became the most expensive form for nearly half of the 19 fruits (fig. 11b).
Frozen fruit was the most expensive way to eat 4 of the 16 fruits. Oranges
and pineapple were most expensive when eaten fresh.
The cheapest way to buy fruit was fairly evenly distributed between fresh
(5), juice (6), and canned (5) (fig. 12a). Frozen and dried fruit were never
the cheapest way to buy fruit. When converted to servings, the cheapest way
to eat fruit was overwhelmingly fresh (fig. 12b). Two-thirds of all fruits
were cheapest when eaten fresh. Juice was the cheapest route to eat fruit for
3 of the 16 fruits. Canned was never the cheapest way to eat fruit. Dried
apricots and raisins were the most expensive way to buy those two fruits
(apricots and grapes), but when converted to servings they were actually the
cheapest way to eat them. This is because dried fruit has such a high per-
serving yield and the serving size is smaller, ¼ cup instead of ½ cup for
other forms of fruit.
Although there were price differences for different forms of fruits, the
dollar-per-serving difference between the most and least expensive form of
the same fruits was typically small (fig. 13). For example, the price per
serving was 25 cents for fresh apricots, 37 cents for canned apricots, and 22
cents for dried apricots, so the price spread was 15 cents per serving. For
half of the fruits in the sample, the price difference per serving between the
most and least expensive forms was less than 25 cents, and for all but one
fruit—peaches (canned vs. frozen)—it was under 50 cents.

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